womenwhokickass:

Amaranta Gomez Regalado: Why she kicks ass
She is an HIV/AIDS activist who has won international grants to further her work with the Muxhe community and with migrant women.
She also is a social researcher, columnist and promotes indigenous cultural identity, and  is a member of the State Committee Against Homophobia.
She identifies as Muxhe and Two-Spirit, and speaks Zapotec and Spanish. She has studied language and theatre at Veracruz University and toured southern Mexico as a travésti performer.
She is a co-founder of Mexico Possible party, and was its candidate for Federal Deputy in 2003. Because of this she was the first transgender Mexican to run for office.

womenwhokickass:

Amaranta Gomez Regalado: Why she kicks ass

  • She is an HIV/AIDS activist who has won international grants to further her work with the Muxhe community and with migrant women.
  • She also is a social researcher, columnist and promotes indigenous cultural identity, and is a member of the State Committee Against Homophobia.
  • She identifies as Muxhe and Two-Spirit, and speaks Zapotec and Spanish. She has studied language and theatre at Veracruz University and toured southern Mexico as a travésti performer.
  • She is a co-founder of Mexico Possible party, and was its candidate for Federal Deputy in 2003. Because of this she was the first transgender Mexican to run for office.

(via realmikkipedia)

This song is called Mixed Up. My friend Ido wrote these lyrics! I was so excited and proud to turn them into a song. I hope you love it. xo Elisha

CHECK THIS OUT! I have huge respect for the brilliant mind of Jin Haritaworn, and now he’s written a book about us. ASK FOR THIS BOOK IN YOUR CLASSES! Get it into your syllabus!Here are the hot sexy contents: Haunted origins; Where are you from?; From monster to fashion model: regenerating racialized bodies; Is it better to be mixed race?; Hybrid nations, mixed feelings: from marginal man to Obama; Exceptional cities, exceptional citizens: metronormativity and mimeticism; Reckoning with prostitutes: performing Thai femininity; Conclusion: where do we want to go?; http://www.ashgate.com/default.aspx?page=637&calctitle=1&pageSubject=420&sort=title&forthcoming=1&pagecount=2&title_id=8668&edition_id=8932&fb_source=message 

CHECK THIS OUT! I have huge respect for the brilliant mind of Jin Haritaworn, and now he’s written a book about us. ASK FOR THIS BOOK IN YOUR CLASSES! Get it into your syllabus!

Here are the hot sexy contents: Haunted origins; Where are you from?; From monster to fashion model: regenerating racialized bodies; Is it better to be mixed race?; Hybrid nations, mixed feelings: from marginal man to Obama; Exceptional cities, exceptional citizens: metronormativity and mimeticism; Reckoning with prostitutes: performing Thai femininity; Conclusion: where do we want to go?; 

http://www.ashgate.com/default.aspx?page=637&calctitle=1&pageSubject=420&sort=title&forthcoming=1&pagecount=2&title_id=8668&edition_id=8932&fb_source=message 

Yay! Hay mixies, we are going public. This project, portraits and text, is going into the vitrines of the A-Space Gallery in downtown Toronto on January 20, 2012. Hooplah hooplah! If you’re around, come on down. There will be four portraits up: Syrus, Kenji, Nadijah and this one, which was commissioned for Jin Haritaworn’s marvellous new book “The Biopolitics of Mixing.”

Yay! Hay mixies, we are going public. This project, portraits and text, is going into the vitrines of the A-Space Gallery in downtown Toronto on January 20, 2012. Hooplah hooplah! If you’re around, come on down. There will be four portraits up: Syrus, Kenji, Nadijah and this one, which was commissioned for Jin Haritaworn’s marvellous new book “The Biopolitics of Mixing.”

Kinnison
How do you describe your ethnic identity?


i definitely identify with being a person of colour (poc) but not necessarily with being chinese. growing up i always felt like taiwan was more my home than canada ever would be, but since i was 6 i have been raised by a basically all white family. in that way, i have/have access to some forms of white privilege, but i don’t identify with being white. i identify with being a poc because that is how the world sees me but also because i’m damn proud. 
What is the best/worst part of being mixed for you – do you think of it in those terms? 


i can’t say that i have ever thought of the best/worst parts of being mixed. i mean people say that mixed kids are soooooo beautiful… which usually makes me feel exoticized and sexualized as a poc. i used to think it would be easier to just be one or the other… but everyone has very complex intersectionalities and i really can’t really speak to the experiences of either. 
What would you like to see this project do? Do you think it is necessary?

i love that this project exists. i live in guelph, where it feels pretty isolating to be a poc/mixed person. a friend of mine who is mixed showed me this and i loved it. i’ve shared it with lots of other friends. i guess i would love to see this project continue to grow, reach more people, have more stories, make more connections! 
Kinnison
How do you describe your ethnic identity?
i definitely identify with being a person of colour (poc) but not necessarily with being chinese. growing up i always felt like taiwan was more my home than canada ever would be, but since i was 6 i have been raised by a basically all white family. in that way, i have/have access to some forms of white privilege, but i don’t identify with being white. i identify with being a poc because that is how the world sees me but also because i’m damn proud. 
What is the best/worst part of being mixed for you – do you think of it in those terms? 
i can’t say that i have ever thought of the best/worst parts of being mixed. i mean people say that mixed kids are soooooo beautiful… which usually makes me feel exoticized and sexualized as a poc. i used to think it would be easier to just be one or the other… but everyone has very complex intersectionalities and i really can’t really speak to the experiences of either. 
What would you like to see this project do? Do you think it is necessary?
i love that this project exists. i live in guelph, where it feels pretty isolating to be a poc/mixed person. a friend of mine who is mixed showed me this and i loved it. i’ve shared it with lots of other friends. i guess i would love to see this project continue to grow, reach more people, have more stories, make more connections! 
from Thea in Racialicious: ”Going Back Like Babies and Pacifiers; Why I Love Mariah”
But I understand that other people see her as a symbol of the way our culture idealises some kinds of beauty and flays others, the way it remembers and celebrates light-skinned women, and the way it buries and ignores dark-skinned women. The little firestorm of controversy that MC stirs up every time she is mentioned on this site is clear evidence that the fluidity of her race — which to me appears as a joyful overcoming — appears reprehensible to others. I realise now, after reading the comments from all the Mariah posts on Racialicious, that people despise her for the very reason I love her: the fact that she’s been packaged both as white and black. I see it as the fact that its never too late to be the person you wanted to be; others view it as an obscene kind of inconsistency, as someone who will use people and cultures to their own end, and then throw them away.
For me, Mariah will always be a reminder that you don’t have to be half of anything. She’s still my secret ally in the battle to maintain my sense of self, a figure who tells me to eff all those other people who don’t respect who I am, and just go my own way: things will work out in the end.

from Thea in Racialicious: ”Going Back Like Babies and Pacifiers; Why I Love Mariah”

But I understand that other people see her as a symbol of the way our culture idealises some kinds of beauty and flays others, the way it remembers and celebrates light-skinned women, and the way it buries and ignores dark-skinned women. The little firestorm of controversy that MC stirs up every time she is mentioned on this site is clear evidence that the fluidity of her race — which to me appears as a joyful overcoming — appears reprehensible to others. I realise now, after reading the comments from all the Mariah posts on Racialicious, that people despise her for the very reason I love her: the fact that she’s been packaged both as white and black. I see it as the fact that its never too late to be the person you wanted to be; others view it as an obscene kind of inconsistency, as someone who will use people and cultures to their own end, and then throw them away.

For me, Mariah will always be a reminder that you don’t have to be half of anything. She’s still my secret ally in the battle to maintain my sense of self, a figure who tells me to eff all those other people who don’t respect who I am, and just go my own way: things will work out in the end.

Syrus Marcus Ware
How do you describe your ethnic identity?
I am 100% human, but am also 50% jessica (my twin). I am mixed race, I am black, I am transsexual and I am an identical twin.
 My mom is white, My dad is black.
Do you identify more with one side of your ethnic identity over others? Why?
I am black. I identify as black.

Syrus Marcus Ware

How do you describe your ethnic identity?

I am 100% human, but am also 50% jessica (my twin). I am mixed race, I am black, I am transsexual and I am an identical twin.
 My mom is white, My dad is black.

Do you identify more with one side of your ethnic identity over others? Why?

I am black. I identify as black.

Kenji
How do you describe your ethnic identity?
Nikkei. I just learned this word from Japanese Canadian elders in BC, and then of course, my grandmother was surprised that I didn’t know what it meant when I told her about just learning it. It is to describe Japanese migrants and their descendants, worldwide.

Kenji

How do you describe your ethnic identity?

Nikkei. I just learned this word from Japanese Canadian elders in BC, and then of course, my grandmother was surprised that I didn’t know what it meant when I told her about just learning it. It is to describe Japanese migrants and their descendants, worldwide.

rabbit23 said: Do you get offended when people call you Oreo? I do.

yeah! that stuff is racist. I used to call myself banana til I realized I was just degrading myself to make my white friends laugh. Bah! - Elisha

Hi guys! Thea and I have been seriously AWOL but I’m back on the project and looking for more folks to draw. 
I’m trying a new style - no more digital colour. Now it’s all analog - pastels and lots of colourful backgrounds. I’d like to do a series of these and show them at a Montréal gallery in the spring. The questionnaire answers would be typed up in their own frame.
If you like the style and would like to submit your questionnaire answers and a photo for me to draw for the show, please do! If you already have, let me know that you’re in again for the pastel show. Don’t be shy! I’ll take it as a compliment.
<3 Elisha
this is Leroi. He identifies as a no-home homo

Hi guys! Thea and I have been seriously AWOL but I’m back on the project and looking for more folks to draw. 

I’m trying a new style - no more digital colour. Now it’s all analog - pastels and lots of colourful backgrounds. I’d like to do a series of these and show them at a Montréal gallery in the spring. The questionnaire answers would be typed up in their own frame.

If you like the style and would like to submit your questionnaire answers and a photo for me to draw for the show, please do! If you already have, let me know that you’re in again for the pastel show. Don’t be shy! I’ll take it as a compliment.

<3 Elisha

this is Leroi. He identifies as a no-home homo

 
"I almost couldn’t read the comments that insinuated Mariah was the worst kind of race traitor, a person who played up her blackness, her whiteness and her mixedness whenever she liked, in order to make millions to finance her Hello Kitty Castle.
Reading these threads, the feeling I had was similar to reading criticism of myself; it was as if I had written a post that was really badly received. But this is some high level cognitive mash-up: my beloved Racialicious community was talking about Mariah, not me.
&#8230;

Yet I have never felt that Mariah plays up any part of her ethnic heritage, except to patiently attempt to explain, again and again, who her people are, and to mention in a very low-drama way, that her experience of biraciality has been a painful one.
Sometimes, the reason why we are smitten with celebrities is because we see facets of our own struggles in their lives. Or perhaps more accurately, we project our own troubles onto the vague details of celebrity lives, and then imagine that just the two of us are secret allies in the war of life.&#8221;

From Thea&#8217;s Racialicious Mariah Carey article 

 

"I almost couldn’t read the comments that insinuated Mariah was the worst kind of race traitor, a person who played up her blackness, her whiteness and her mixedness whenever she liked, in order to make millions to finance her Hello Kitty Castle.

Reading these threads, the feeling I had was similar to reading criticism of myself; it was as if I had written a post that was really badly received. But this is some high level cognitive mash-up: my beloved Racialicious community was talking about Mariah, not me.

Yet I have never felt that Mariah plays up any part of her ethnic heritage, except to patiently attempt to explain, again and again, who her people are, and to mention in a very low-drama way, that her experience of biraciality has been a painful one.

Sometimes, the reason why we are smitten with celebrities is because we see facets of our own struggles in their lives. Or perhaps more accurately, we project our own troubles onto the vague details of celebrity lives, and then imagine that just the two of us are secret allies in the war of life.”

From Thea’s Racialicious Mariah Carey article 

Thea talks about MC and being mixed on Racialicious.com:

"Going Back Like Babies and Pacifiers; Why I Love Mariah"

How do you define mixed?
Jin: Definitions always seem to leave people behind&#8230;

How do you define mixed?

Jin: Definitions always seem to leave people behind…

Lehua
1. How do you describe your ethnic identity?I define myself as Chamoru. I was born in Yigo, Guam. My mother is Chamoru; my father is White. 
4. Do you experience discrimination based on your race?Everysingleday.4a. Do you experience discrimination based on being mixed?Everysingleday.5. If you could choose, would you want to be mixed?Everysingleday.

Lehua

1. How do you describe your ethnic identity?

I define myself as Chamoru. I was born in Yigo, Guam. My mother is Chamoru; my father is White. 

4. Do you experience discrimination based on your race?

Everysingleday.

4a. Do you experience discrimination based on being mixed?

Everysingleday.

5. If you could choose, would you want to be mixed?

Everysingleday.

Colin
1. How do you describe your ethnic identity?
I define myself as bi-racial. Usually I’ll add that my father’s black and my mother’s white, and if people insist on knowing more, I’ll tell them where they’re from and where their parents are from.
6. What is the best/worst part of being mixed for you – do you think of it in those terms?
There are issues of identity that I struggle with, not really knowing where I belong so to speak. I think the worst part is wishing I could speak on issues relating to the black community more forcefully. I don’t share the same sense of being “the other,” the only black guy in the room. I’ve never had a cop harass me or been followed around a store or turned down for a job, never been discriminated against ever really, so I don’t feel I can strongly identify with black people the way I’d like to. As for the white part of me, I get so annoyed by the racist or ignorant comments I hear from white folks, that I wish I could just be black. So I guess the worst part is trying to pick a side, even though that’s a silly thing to think one should do.

Best part: having a mixed background is a great conversation starter. It’s fun to talk about your background with people. 

Colin

1. How do you describe your ethnic identity?

I define myself as bi-racial. Usually I’ll add that my father’s black and my mother’s white, and if people insist on knowing more, I’ll tell them where they’re from and where their parents are from.

6. What is the best/worst part of being mixed for you – do you think of it in those terms?

There are issues of identity that I struggle with, not really knowing where I belong so to speak. I think the worst part is wishing I could speak on issues relating to the black community more forcefully. I don’t share the same sense of being “the other,” the only black guy in the room. I’ve never had a cop harass me or been followed around a store or turned down for a job, never been discriminated against ever really, so I don’t feel I can strongly identify with black people the way I’d like to. As for the white part of me, I get so annoyed by the racist or ignorant comments I hear from white folks, that I wish I could just be black. So I guess the worst part is trying to pick a side, even though that’s a silly thing to think one should do.

Best part: having a mixed background is a great conversation starter. It’s fun to talk about your background with people.